daco itw

 

Tiffany Godoy, you have a lot of different activities in fashion. For those who don’t know you yet, can you introduce them?
I specialize in content initiative and creation. I’ve worked in fashion, specifically in editorial field for about 20 years. I spend most of my time in Tokyo but also live in Paris and Los Angeles. This triangle represents luxury, tradition and innovation and this is what I bring to all my clients.

Tiffany Godoy, you have a lot of different activities in fashion. For those who don’t know you yet, can you introduce them?
I specialize in content initiative and creation. I’ve worked in fashion, specifically in editorial field for about 20 years. I spend most of my time in Tokyo but also live in Paris and Los Angeles. This triangle represents luxury, tradition and innovation and this is what I bring to all my clients.

When you create content for your clients, you’re always faced with big loads of data, both structured and unstructured. What is your vision on how data should be used by brands and retailers today?
Because of my background in Asia. I’ve lived organically with technologies for a long time which I believe becomes very much integrated in people’s daily lives. Technology and data, now more than ever, are a way to streamline cost, time, efficiency and creativity. They help you understand what the needs are for customers: because you get to know specifically which commercial products, which ad spaces or which campaigns you need to create. Creative people are granted a lot more space to focus on the artistry, the fantasy, the idea of creation, the kind of mythology we are all seduced by.
I think that the fact they don’t have to play a guessing game anymore, or think like a marketer frees creatives, and enables them to craft really beautiful and dense collections, which are then filtered down into more commercial ideas.
However, using data doesn’t force you to format your vision either. In fashion like in technology, like with people, there is a need to introduce new things and it moves like culture, like a natural cycle. Thus, [even though data would suggest you take a certain creative path], you can always take your chances at the top and test out new things.
Diana Vreeland once said: “Give ‘em what they never knew they wanted”. It’s like a relationship as well. You have to try new things.

As you said, Big Data generates insight, and gives you the dynamics behind it, but it’s only a guideline: creativity remains key. [By using data], you gain time, understand which directions to consider, and concentrate, densify collections…
Absolutely, I think Big Data is the ultimate business partner. It helps you to make wise decisions and it helps you to do what you do better.

Do you see any difference between luxury brands and mass market brands in their use of Big Data?
Anything that is not luxury, is to me a lot more innovative, and a lot freer of constraints and heritage -in the negative sense. We have a lot of digital native brands that are very niche, who are providing certain specific services or specific specialties to the market, who are basing a lot of product development on information they get from clients, purchased data and interactions on social media. As a result, their creativity and branding is super concrete.
As for luxury fashion, I would say it is a little bit stuck in it’s ways, also in terms of management. There is a more visible lack of partnerships I would say [between creative and business departments].

You’re an expert of Asian markets. What is your insight on their use of new technologies today in retail?
Asia is a digital native. As for Japan, where I have lived since the end of the 90’s, technology has adapted to people lifestyles. It’s like fashion. Whether it’s the Walkman™, created for commutes or hand-held games… People are used to the convenience of technology and how it improves life. The Japanese use the word: “Omotenashi” which means “selfless service”.
Actually the Japanese government is creating a guideline where you can get a certificate depending on the level of service you provide, for instance if you have an English-speaking staff, you are not charged fees for international transactions… In fact, it’s all about efficiency when it comes to Asia, because people want things quicker, they want to know the best product as soon as possible. You especially see that in Hong Kong and China.

You often mention the growing importance of new e-commerce channels in Asia, such as WeChat [top active social platform in China] …
WeChat is social mixed with e-commerce. Everything all in one. Wechat is an incredible example of how technology can help to enhance life, and they are collecting quite a lot of data as well.
I don’t even know if people realize that in China everything goes to WeChat, even your doctor’s prescription or what you get from the pharmacy. People make a lot of transactions whether it’s with fashion or daily life

Tiffany, thank you so much for your valuable insight today: we’re looking forward to witnessing your next fashion adventures!
I’m looking forward to the evolution you’re going to bring to the fashion industry. Thank you.